Comprehension Mats!

I love graphic organizers.  I just like how easy they are to get the kids thinking.  Especially when it comes to reading, I think that if I ask the kids to use their strategies and process skills in a fun organizer (instead of just writing it on a plain piece of paper) they tend to internalize their response a bit more.    For years I have been using my Reading Log to do just that at home.  Since implementing this log, I have found that the students are actually reading and writing their thoughts in a more meaningful way.

Well, I wanted to try to do something like this in class.  I have already written about the Strategy Logs I have used in the past.  While I think they are great, I found I wanted something a bit more.  The kids were getting used to the logs and their thoughts and responses were suffering because of it.  The Strategy Logs also required a lot of copies, and frankly, this year I am out.  (I like to save them for Calendar, Math HW, Reading Logs, and Morning Message)  So about a month ago, I came up with these Comprehension Mats and my students are LOVING them!

comprehension skills, language arts

comprehension strategies, reading response, laminated
These are the different strategy ones...there are skills too!
Basically, they are two sheets of paper, glued together and laminated.  Each sheet has two different Comprehension strategies or skills on them that the students must complete in response to their reading.  We use the CA Treasures basal, so that is what they have been responding to. (these are only for fiction stories....I wanted to try them out and see if my kids took to them before I made some for non-fiction!)  I mix and match them all up, so that the kids can be responding in a variety of different ways no matter what mat they get.


group work, mrs. moorman, 5th gradeIn my class, we have been using these for both independent work and in groups.  It is really interesting to hear how the students are responding and tackling the tasks during group work.  Their thought processes just come seeping through!  I am really loving that aspect of these mats.  I also like how engaged the students are using them.  To be honest, they are just the same old strategies we have been using all year...but since they are in mat form, and laminated (so they get to use the vis-a-vie markers!) responding to text has taken on a whole new life!  Even finding evidence is fun for them :)





education, teaching, reading response
Here is the work that the group above was working on.  You can see the different thought processes they had to go through when responding to the story for the week.
These mats, with all of the different pieces to create them, are available in my store.  But for you, my followers, I am going to do something special.  I will send you two of the pages so you can make one mat yourself!  All you have to do is click here.  It will take you to the mats on a Google doc.  Easy peezy!  I hope you and your students enjoy!!

211 comments

  1. We started sung HMH Journeys this year and I love using their deepen comprehension questions to build up the weekly skill. Thanks again for your cool ideas, Stephanie!
    jewelz@si.rr.com

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  2. Yet another great idea! I will have to try these next year. se_wolfe@yahoo.com

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  3. We've started doing guided re-telling and the kids really get a kick out of re-telling the story to their reading pal just through the pictures. It allows for a little bit of imagination and I love to see that. marieclaireoba@sbcglobal.net

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  4. From Victoria at: imaginethat04@gmail.com

    HELLO!:) I have created a sort of "Talking Sheet" for the kids to identify and discuss the story elements of a story. I have found that the kids really need to practice responding to a question verbally before they are able to write it down. For example, one card is all about the setting. The first question on the card asks, Where does the story take place? We practice answering that question with a partner and the COACH asks, tell me more. The PLAYER then gives more details. This format has allowed us to go deeper into detail with a partner before writing the response. The partners continue with the next SETTING question on the card, When does the story take place? so on and so forth. The kids can either practice responding verbally or take it to the next level ---WRITING it down!!:) I love it, I get better answers for story elements/book reports and the kids support each other leaving me with the opportunity to circulate the room and listen in/support those who need help.
    Looking forward to trying out your mat structure! My email is imaginethat04@gmail.com

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  5. These would be perfect for my centers especially as my first graders get toward the end of the year. I would love these. Thanks for sharing! :)

    Lisa
    Learning Is Something to Treasure

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    Replies
    1. Oops my email is fsuteach81@yahoo.com
      Thanks!

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    2. These are awesome. I love your video on fluency too. My email is
      loklobzija@comcast.net Thank you so much.

      Delete
  6. With our 5th graders, they've been exposed to and applied strategies for so many years that it takes a lot of creativity to make them "new". We transitioned to student-led book clubs and it made the strategies seem student driven instead of just expected by the teacher. We use strategy mats on a file folder with sticky notes. The sticky notes can go from the book (while reading) to the mat to share during book club discussion. The kids loved it because they picked the book!
    wadkinssusan@gmail.com

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  7. I think this is a great idea! In the fall, our school will be starting HMH Journeys. It will be a change for all of us. I have been doing balanced literacy for the past 10 years. My email is carlamathis2013@gmail.com

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  8. Great idea. I currently use quizzes on class readalouds, Time for Kids magazines, and Lit Circles.
    Email: sholm@loomis-usd.k12.ca.us

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  9. What a fantastic idea! I run a reading workshop classroom, so my kids read "just right" books for independent reading. I'm always looking for ways to keep them accountable to their reading, and I think your mats will work wonderfully! The new thing I tried this year to keep them accountable in their book clubs was to give them a booklet to help them keep track and to share what they're reading. They loved having that little booklet to write down cause/effect, predictions, etc. It worked really well, and I'd be happy to send you a sample! sarahlynngoofy@hotmail.com

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    1. Please do Sarah! Teachinginroom6@yahoo.com

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    2. Sarah- I love the booklet idea. How could a person get a sample from you? - torie.schrick@gmail.com

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    3. Sarah, my 4th grade team and I will be starting Reader's Workshop for the very 1st time. I would also love to see your little booklet, if you would be so kind. Accountability seems to be one of our biggest concerns with this approach. We want to guide the students in the right direction but ensure that they are productive, too. Thank you in advance! jsguetzow@gmail.com

      Delete
    4. Sarah, I would love to see your booklet idea. I am thinking about using Laura Candler's Power Reading Workshop this year in my fifth grade class. Please email me a copy of your booklet- taylors39@k12tn.net

      Delete
  10. Hi Stephanie:

    I love this idea (Okay, I love everything you do!)
    I want to try something like this during one of the Daily 5 rotations. I need more accountability during independent work time.
    How sweet of you to share!
    I hope you are enjoying your summer...

    Kim
    joyin6th@gmail.com

    Finding JOY in 6th Grade

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  11. I love the mat idea. We have a basal, but I am hoping to make the jump back to a workshop, incorporating what I have to from the series. These will be great to help do the strategies with the shared stories we do...and in a way the kids will think is fun. Can't wait to try it--thanks for sharing!
    Melinda
    camprumage@gmail.com

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  12. I started having the students keep a journal as they do their free choice silent reading. Thanks for the great idea!

    lizschuette@gmail.com

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  13. I have used literature bookmarks with great success! If the purpose for reading is to look for figurative language, character traits, or vocabulary, students immediately make notes on the bookmark.They record the info and page number. This also works well with literature circles when they have to share what they have read.I have modified ones from the book 35 Learning Tools from Scholastic. I'm always looking for new ideas!I would love to try out your mats.
    jmeier8579@sbcglobal.net

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  14. I love the reusable aspect! I use a reading log and like you, am finding that my kids get too used to the log and seem to stop giving strong responses. Looking forward to giving these a try.
    Amelia.rivera@aspirepublicschools.org

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  15. During our last trimester, I had my kids trade their reading logs with each other and make 2 positive comments & a question. We spent a lot of time learning how to write positive comments and appropriate questions, but it was worth it in the end.
    Looking forward to seeing the mats. Sounds like something I could really use.
    grawetl@grandschools.org

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  16. I use Kagan structures to have teams verbally share about a story.
    I'm looking forward to trying your idea.

    taskcard123@yahoo.com
    Yearn to Learn Blog

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  17. I really like these mats! I've created a reading log, somewhat similar to yours. Previously, students turned in a list of books they read each quarter, signed by the parents. I wanted something that held them more accountable, and made them think about their reading. The logs allow for some choice, but 3 different activities listed must be completed by the end of the quarter.

    sander.katie@gmail.com

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  18. This past year I began using reading workshop. The kids responded to their reading in a journal. While this worked for some kids, others just slopped over it. These mats sound like a great idea and I am looking forward to trying this out. Thanks for sharing so many awesome ideas.
    joann.johnson@robeson.k12.nc.us

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  19. These look great! This year I've started using literature circles to build comprehension and practice using the strategies. I would love to happy a copy of your comprehension maps, my email is shellabelle81@gmail.com. Thanks!

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  20. Love that this is more structured than journals. Some students would write tons while others a sentence or 2. Linbet21@yahoo.com

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  21. Thank you! I now use reading response journals. The kids respond to a piece of reading daily. The response depends on what I am teaching them.
    Monica Headley
    Headleyfamily@comcast.net

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  22. We use many different things like re telling and graphic organizers but the kids all time fav is the comprehension ball. It is a beach ball with basic comprehension questions and we use it get the juices flowing! The kids like throwing it around and answering the questions their hand lands on.

    I love all your ideas! Just did the foil balloons for our mission project and the kids were so proud when we had our mission museum.
    Thanks!
    Katie
    Katiebell173@gmail.com

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    1. I would love to see the pictures of that Katie!

      Delete
  23. Hi Stephanie,
    What a cute idea! Kids love anything that involves a vis a vis marker I have found! :)

    Something I started this past year was a reading response journal. I would give the kiddos a prompt from the story and they would glue the prompt into their spiral and respond to the story along with a certain type of skill (Author's purpose, main idea, citing examples of cause/ effect, etc.). As the year went on, they were expected to respond in more detail. They also needed to include a big, bright, beautiful picture.

    Every week the kids responded to literature, and every week I responded to each and every one of their responses. The kids couldn't wait to see what response I wrote in their journal. It was fun to see how much the kids changed throughout the year and it was definitely a parent keepsake since so many of their thoughts were recorded in journal format. :)

    Thanks so much for a very cute product.
    ~Paige
    spokelley@verizon.net

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  24. What a great idea....I am always looking for ways to save on paper. This year with the Common Core Curriculum, our basal series didn't offer too much so I was able to begin Literature Circles using novels sets. I believe these mats could be a great addition.

    My email address is bmdulittle@gmail.com

    Thanks,
    Bernita

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  25. Love this idea, love your blog, love everything you do! As our 6th grade Language Art's team starts implementing Common Core Units, I can totally see this helping us...I look forward to seeing your non-fiction mats as well. One of the more successful comprehension strategies is an oldie, but I like using double entry journals. When students choose a line of text, and write their own thinking next to the author's words, I can tell they are thinking deeply. Thanks for all you do to help us become better teachers!

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  26. oops! email address: amelsbree@gmail.com

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  27. We're switching to common core, so I'm trying to revamp as much as I can from what I did this year. I'm working on reading comprehension and essay analysis exercises for my middle school kids so they can evaluate different writing techniques. Thank you so much!
    mvazqu01@yahoo.com

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  28. I will be teaching 5th grade this year for the first time. Going to adapt my silent reading from 3rd grade to 5th. Right after lunch, settles everyone down, read 15 minutes (or more) and write a 20 word summary.
    sandifisherx6@verizon.net. Really going to be following you closely this year:)

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  29. I will be teaching 5th grade this year for the first time. Going to adapt my silent reading from 3rd grade to 5th. Right after lunch, settles everyone down, read 15 minutes (or more) and write a 20 word summary.
    sandifisherx6@verizon.net. Really going to be following you closely this year:)

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  30. OK...I got everyone up to here! Let me know if you didn't get them :)
    ~Steph

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  31. Hi,
    Let me try this again... my other comment disappeared...

    I love your blog and thank you for your ideas. =) This past year I started playing this game called BANG with the class for Reading and Math comprehension. Basically for Reading every Thursday before we review the story I pass out index cards and the kids have to come up with a question that has to do with the story and they have to use the skills/strategies to create it (example - What was a connection you made with the main character? What can we infer about ______?) After they are done writing they pass them in to me, and then we play the game. I add about 5 BANG cards to the mix, shuffle them all, and then I choose a stick (their names are on popsicle sticks) and that person has to answer the question. I leave the popsicle sticks that have been chosen out on my cart so the kids know they are safe until there is a BANG card - then everyone's sticks go back into the mix. If they don't know the answer to the question they can look it up in their books, their story notes, their vocabulary booklets, or they can "phone a friend". It has made review time fun!

    Sincerely,
    Emily
    emom3boys@yahoo.com

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  32. I just started following your blog recently and I love your ideas---this one is great! This year I started something new and simply called them "Reading Responses." I make a tic-tac-toe board of various reading activities that the students could choose from (any 6 out of 9), that they had to complete over a quarter. I made an instruction sheet & rubric for each activity and kept everything in a designated binder in my room, so that the students could work on the projects whenever they had free time, or during LA workshop. I tried to mix in different types of activities so that they weren't always writing a response. They ended up really liking it!

    JackieRomo08@gmail.com

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  33. Something that I have started is a reading blog. I am using a secure blogging site called kidblog in which students read assigned chapters or parts and respond. The kids love it, but the trick is I ask questions that require a little more thought and inferring rather than questions with answers that could be quickly located. This is encouraging my readers to also be thinkers.
    Megan.storey@paducah.kyschools.us

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  34. Something that I have started is a reading blog. I am using a secure blogging site called kidblog in which students read assigned chapters or parts and respond. The kids love it, but the trick is I ask questions that require a little more thought and inferring rather than questions with answers that could be quickly located. This is encouraging my readers to also be thinkers.
    Megan.storey@paducah.kyschools.us

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  35. This sounds like a cool idea to go along with my 6th grade readers notebooks and book clubs. In their book clubs groups, I usually have them focus on a specific literature element. This could help mix things up.

    P.S. I am a new blogger but my lessons focus on 6th grade. Check out my blog when you have time :)
    Justin
    justgreene@yahoo.com
    http://inthegreeneroom.blogspot.com/

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  36. Thank you so much! The mats have endless possibilities; story mapping, vocabulary, graphic organizers, character mapping, inferences,etc. My email is taylors392k12tn.net

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    Replies
    1. Your email bounced back to me. I know it is missing an @ sign, but is there anything else you left out?

      Delete
    2. Sorry, Stephanie! My email is:
      taylors39@k12tn.net

      Delete
  37. I use Triple entry vocabulary literacy strategy for learning vocabulary.It can be used in all subjects - not just reading.
    In most courses understanding vocabulary is central to understanding the content.

    In this strategy, students find the definitions of vocab words their teacher notes as critical for their learning. Students copy the definitions word for word out of the book. The best way to do this is for students to read the chapter and record the definitions as they come across them. If students do this, they will get the meaning in context. In the next column of the chart, students need to use the word in an original sentence that conveys the meaning of the word. Part of learning new words involves using them effectively in everyday language. If students use a new word 3-5 times correctly it becomes part of their vocab. If students write an original sentence that's using it once, then they just have to come up with 2-4 more times on their own. The last column involves coming up with a memory device to help them to remember the term. Researchers have demonstrated that this is the most important column for the students. They can use a picture, a diagram, a sentence, lyrics... what ever helps them to remember the term. Thank you! heybehbeh@hotmail.com

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  38. This year, I taught 6th grade LA. I did a novel study with the book Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli and I gave the students post-it notes to write down connection, predictions, etc. from the novel. I've never done this before and it went well, especially since the kids didn't feel overwhelmed b/c the post-its aren't that big.

    I love the comprehension mats!
    Joyce- joyce.eizenga@yahoo.com

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  39. I like the mat idea! I believe it will get the kids thinking more deeply and it's different because they can use the vis-a-vis. I just looked at your reading log and really like that also. It is so much better than having kids record the pages they read and get a signature. I just put it on my wish list. Thanks for all your wonderful ideas!!
    mhawk888@gmail.com

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  40. These comprehension mats are such a great idea! In my 4th grade class, I have used post-its for years for kids to keep track of their thinking while they read. This year, I began using the transparent post-its for the 1st time so my struggling readers could highlight ideas more easily and respond to them. These worked especially well with nonfiction text features, as students could put the transparent post-it on a given feature (map, caption, etc.) and could see it while they wrote about it.

    Thanks for your great ideas!
    Michelle
    joshandmichelle@hotmail.com

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  41. My students were required to keep a genre book log. After reading a book they would write a summary and reflection. They had to read 9 different genres, at least, and many of them realized they enjoyed them.
    Email: mrucka@gmail.com

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  42. Sounds great. I use reading response journals for them to respond to questions about the material. These seem fun and different too.
    nea1226@comcast.net

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  43. What a great idea...thank you so much for sharing! I will be moving from 4th to 3rd and we are implementing Daily 5 and of course Common Core so I am anxious to find some fresh ideas that will be a welcome addition to what I am already using. My students last year got too comfortable with the reading logs and I noticed a decline in the quality of work I was receiving. I think "mixing it up" is a good idea and I can see using these mats as just the ticket. Looking forward to receiving the mat sample. I also "pinned it" to my Reading Workshop board!
    Thanks again,
    Nancy

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  44. Oops...forgot my e-mail address :(
    nancydrav4@hotmail.com
    (senior moment!)

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  45. Such great ideas!! Keep 'em coming :) Thank you all for sharing...I have everyone up until this point.
    ~Steph

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  46. I was new to 2nd grade this year after 27 years of being with older kids. WOW!!!! It was really challenging....... I had a smartboard in my room for the first time, so my new thing was learning how to use it. I found some super smartboard reading lessons that had been done by other teachers that were using the HM series like me. I would love to sample your reading mats. Thanks.
    susanlulu@yahoo.com

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  47. I would love to try these!
    historyhammond@yahoo.com

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  48. This will be a lot of fun for my class next year! One thing I did with the strategies this year was that as I taught the strategies, the kids wrote them on index cards and then put them on notebook rings. That way, they each had their own set of strategies they could flip through when writing about their reading. It was great for test review also.
    Joanie
    Mrswilcox@aol.com

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  49. Hi Stephanie,
    It hasn't come through yet... =(
    Maybe I can give you my other email instead?
    It was emom3boys@yahoo.com, my other email is esumma@sbcglobal.net
    Thanks!
    Sincerely,
    Emily

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    Replies
    1. I sent it to both emails again. Hopefully it comes this time :)

      Delete
  50. I used a template for students to retell a story. Since I teach students that are K-8 grade, each child had a different version that was more applicable to the grade level and the skills that they needed to work on. We also used checklist to make sure all parts were included. I am interested in the mats.

    fscjc2@yahoo.com

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  51. We started a skill of the month in addition to our series.
    Melissa
    Iamelmosgirl@gmail.com

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  52. I use some of the activities from the Super 6 Comprehension Strategies book...some are worksheet, but some are not--in which case they would use chart paper and sticky notes. I'd love to see your mats and try to use them in the classroom during Universal Access/Daily 5!
    Thanks! Cerissa katawa@hotmail.com

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  53. I love this idea. I currently use trifolds with strategy questions built in. The kids like them but I love the variety these mats offer!

    Mross@pdsd.org

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  54. I really like this idea. We are trying to find ways to be more ecofriendly (read that as not making as many copies) so this is perfect. One thing I did new last year was to give tickets to students when then found examples of similes, metaphors, idioms, and personification while they were pleasure reading. They would come to me with their book show me the figurative language and then explain what it meant, what was being compared, and how it enhanced their understanding of the story. Eventually, they started coming up to me with examples of the focus strategy and words of the week words. Several students also took this to another level and showed me examples of what they were learning about in science, social studies, or math! The tickets were used in a drawing for little prizes on Friday afternoons. This one simple idea was a great formative assessment and helped show students that learning is cross-curricular!

    Heidi Weber
    hweber923@gmail.com

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  55. What an awesome idea! Love it!

    I did something similar this year with non-fiction articles and had my students code the text using dry erase markers. Somehow, using dry erase markers on a laminated page was all it took to motivate my 6th graders!!!

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  56. I love your mats and can see an easy implementation into a reading center or small group format. Yeah, can't wait to see the mats up close!

    This last year, I used sticky notes and an interactive bulletin board. Each day, I asked students to use a specific reading strategy and written response. The students have their name posted on the board and place the sticky note above their name. Each day was a different color so I could easily see who needed to finish or needed help. A scoring guide was also placed on the board. I used stickers to reward a good response. (They worked hard for the sticker, funny...)
    At the beginning of a new day, students placed the old response into a journal. It was fun watching the colorful journals grow.


    nancy wray
    nancy505@centurytel.net

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  57. Sugar! I forgot my email!

    L.DiBella7@gmail.com

    Thanks!!

    ReplyDelete
  58. Hey Stephanie,

    I love your ideas, and your site. I am completely changing my literacy program for next year...trying to keep my 6's engaged.

    ilanagreen1@gmail.com

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  59. Thank you in advance for the mat sample! blueunicorn1974@gmail.com

    One thing I am doing to teach reading comprehension is by doing "language arts Olympics" in my summer school classroom. The students have reading comprehension packets. Each time they get a set of reading questions right they move on to the next level. At the end of the period we read one of the passages and work on the questions together. I like that the students have to try to find the answers on their own, then we all work as a team to help the students who may have struggled a bit.

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  60. I only teach math, but I would love to adapt this concept to use in my math classroom. I could see adapting the idea to use with problem solving to begin with.

    Thanks Stephanie!

    luvbcd@yahoo.com

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  61. Thanks for a great idea! I look forward to using it in my classroom.
    Beth
    bcartlidge@bellsouth.net

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  62. OK...everyone is taken care of up until this point! Thanks again for sharing everyone :)
    ~Steph

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  63. I love this idea, though honestly I've never thought of doing comprehension mats. I'm excited to try out an new idea with my daughter, whom I homeschool. Thanks! parkepreschool@yahoo.com

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  64. These would be helpful with our special education students.
    Marianne
    mabtennis@gmail.com

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  65. I can see how these mats would really engage the kids. I would love to try one. Thank you! Something new I did this year was to implement literature circles with a reader's workshop notebook. It worked best when I had a mom facilitator for each reading group. The moms loved getting a peak into our classroom. I teach fourth.
    Jennifer
    jzolikoff@q.com

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  66. What a great idea! I too would love to try one out. This year was my first year teaching reading and comprehension through the workshop model. We pretty much were given a fly-through one day "training" and then were sent to hit the ground running with it. We did receive some support throughout the year, but it was really a crash course and go experience. I attempted to use readers' notebooks (binders) with the students writing response letters to their writing, but found their responses lacking. I would love to use these response mats to get them more engaged with their reading! =)
    hminckler@hotmail.com
    http://cantmakethisstuffup-hmichaud.blogspot.com/

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  67. I would love to try these.
    One thing i do in my classroom when we use the basal for stories is to create lapbooks with all the skills needed such as vocab, setting, characters with traits, plot, and on the front of the foldabe the students draw their favorite part of the story. It's great and I can get several grades. No two are alike but by the end of the year they can complete them on their own. Then we display them in the hallway.
    tngarret@episd.org

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  68. These look great. I have been using comprehension bookmarks with my third graders for a brief check of understanding. I like the longer length of your comprehension mats. They would make a great buddy station. hansgretel@yahoo.com

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  69. These look neat! I a planning to do more centers in my classroom this year this coming year, and I think this ideas would be a great additions. I have been using the writing jouranl that my kids have a as reading journal as well. They make notes, respond to reading and write in the same space.This was new t me at thebeginning of this past year and I have seen a lot of success with it. I look forard to more success in the fall.

    ramcknight@hotmail.com

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  70. What a great idea! I love how you save paper! One thing new I tried this year for my students in comprehension was a popsicle stick activity. I typed up questions, printed and laminated them and stuck them on popsicle sticks. My students would pick a stick and answer the question. Sometimes I would select 5 sticks that I wanted everyone to answer. They wrote their answers in reading journals. My email is

    teachermom@bex.net

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  71. Isn't it funny how a different format can suddenly help motivate?

    We worked on comprehension the last few weeks of school using the tab book format that I found on someone's blog. I found it great for differentiating - younger ones placed three pictures from the story in order and then dictated a sentence describing what was happening, older ones did it without the pictures, and even older ones had to give more complex sentences.

    I would love to try the mat idea.

    Valerie

    zputty@gmail.com

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  72. I love your wet-erase comprehension mats! This truly allows for differentiation (different mats for different reading students/groups) and "digging deeper" into texts.

    My ultimate goal is for students to be able to independently respond to text, naturally and deeply. I use "thinking tracks" and students record predictions, connections, reactions, visualizations, etc. Students have to be taught explicitly how to respond using each reading/thinking strategy.

    I would love a sample of your mats to experiment with a different format of reinforcing comprehension. Students love trying something new, so this would be great for my Reading Room.

    Kristin (MsJordanReads)
    msjordanreads@gmail.com

    Reading Writing Thinking Sharing

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  73. At the end of last school year, I found something that really worked well with comprehension and my kids loved it! I used Retelling Response Projects by Mandy Gregory. This didn't hit all the comprehension strategies, but it did help. I didn't have enough time to tweek it for the skills it didn't hit since I found it at the end of the school year. I would really love to try the mat idea, though!
    Charlotte

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    1. BTW, my email is hindman.c@gmail.com!

      Delete
  74. Thank you all who have given such great ideas! Such a wealth of knowledge and strategies here :)

    I have sent the preview mats out to everyone so far.

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  75. What a great idea! I've done made little booklets or books with stories and their follow up activities, but I love the idea of laminating two pages side by side.
    peninagoldstein@comcast.net

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  76. Great Idea - I've been using Storyworks in my centers and the mats would would work great for comprehension.

    Thanks in advance for the great idea!

    Jacqui
    jhealey@naschools.net

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  77. What a wonderful idea! My school has just implemented in the balanced literacy approach in our ELA classes and it has made a dramatic change in our students reading comprehension level. Eshepherd79@gmail.com

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  78. I'm an education intern. Have been having a hard time finding a teaching job. But I am staying in touch with all things education. This is turn will help me to be a better classroom teacher when I get my job. For now I am just learning as much as I can. Would love to get a copy to add to my idea book.
    Thanks, Sandra
    alvarado-s@att.net

    ReplyDelete
  79. love and follow your blog...cant wait to use this!
    dmmaly64@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  80. I teach at a school that uses SFA, we use read and respond for homework, but kids do get tired of it after doing in K-2 (I teach 3rd), so I try to encourage reading through a variety of ways.. this also helps in the classroom.

    As far as comprehension, we partner read and discuss the treasure hunt questions provided by SFA, however, I also have students ask questions that are not in the treasure hunt...write them on sticky notes and then we discuss...

    I love this idea you have shared!

    Lorri
    swaffol@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  81. What a great idea! Can't wait to use this with my students.
    eglenski@kc.rr.com

    ReplyDelete
  82. I love this idea! It's just another great way to keep the kids engaged. Last year I started incorporating some foldables into my reading program which the kids really like.
    My email is jlobb86@gmail.com
    Thanks so much!!

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  83. What a neat idea, and a great way to save on paper! :) We do comprehension journals, but this year, I tried focus walls with our basal and I felt the kids got a lot more out of it! Also incorporated the vocabulary into the homework and made packets that consisted of language arts, comp, and math review.

    youelcm@gmail.com :)

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  84. Again, thank you so much for contributing such wonderful ideas! You all should have mail in your inbox!

    ~Stephanie

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  85. This year I also started including foldables. We also use Reading Response Journals. I also just got the book Revisit, Reflect, Retell by Linda Hoyt who has some great activities to add to the arsenal. Can't wait to try this out too!

    Thanks, Sharon

    Sledelman@ca.rr.com

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  86. I have used bookmarks which have a few of the questions that are on the mats- it's not enough! I would love to have the mats to laminate. Thank you!

    Sheri

    sherii at cfl dot rr dot com

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  87. We use "treasure hunts" for our reading program. Basically it's 4 questions that the students have to answer after reading a section of the story. I really like the idea of your mats! Anytime students can write with vis-a-vis markers, and in color, they love it and will focus more. Thanks for sharing! Megan_phie444@hotmail.com

    Megan

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  88. I am a special education tutor and these would be great to help my students stay actively engaged in using comprehension strategies and skills. kschmit@swbell.net

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  89. I love the sharing of ideas, as I always like to mix it up so nothing becomes "boring" for the kiddos. I've used flash cards, comprehension cubes, and beach balls to practice comprehension strategies. With the implementation o common core though, I think it's a great idea to use the mats to integrate more text support. Thanks for your great ideas... I'm a new fan!

    Email: sdlerch@gmail.com

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  90. I would love to get a copy of your comprehension mat! We have been working on reading strategies this past year - connections, questioning, visualizing, inferring, etc. These will be awesome! My email is conniegilliam@benlippen.com
    THanks!

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  91. I have used reading journals in the past with my kiddos, but love the idea of your comprehension mats. Can't wait to try them out with my new class this year! Thank you for your great ideas! pjblank@comcast.net

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  92. I use Post-it notes with EVERYTHING, including their independent reading to hold them more accountable. They have a "Sticky Note Journal" with sentence starters, categorized by reading strategies (summarizing, predicting, questioning, etc.). The journal also includes 2 pages for each book that they read, split into columns by strategy. When the students are finished reading their book, they take their sticky notes out and place them in the correct strategy column. Every week or so I spot-check and conference on their journals, checking for the use of the strategies (and number of entries!). Thanks again for another great idea to use in my classroom!
    bradley_chesterman@comcast.net

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  93. I used reading response letters this year. The kids really enjoyed reading my replies, and it made their writing more authentic. I read your blog regularly and have adapted many of your ideas for my class. Thanks for sharing!
    ~karen
    kproctor@wcpss.net

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  94. LOVE this idea! Something new I used with my students this year is to have them track their thinking by using sticky notes to document their thoughts/questions throughout their reading. I really like your idea though! It would save a LOT of sticky notes... :)

    Thanks for sharing!

    ~Sara~ (saraannmiller@gmail.com)
    Ramblings of a Deaf Ed Teacher's Mind...

    ReplyDelete
  95. I love your idea of the mats. We currently use CAFE strategies, and I can relate to the same strategies and questions, just in a new format. I think the students would love these. Thanks for the Freebee! kkondrick@gmail.com

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  96. I think my students would enjoy the comprehension mats! This year, our team has been thinking about doing a book club with our weekly basal story and these mats would be a great way for students to hear each others thinking. Thanks so much for the free start to a great idea.
    ljneal@bellsouth.net

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  97. OK everyone...I have sent it out up until here.

    Again, I appreciate you all sharing your ideas with us!

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  98. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  99. LOVE YOUR BLOG! Thank you for sharing such great ideas. I am planning on using Harvey Daniels Mini-Lessons for Literacy Circles this year. It had some good ideas for responding to literature. I also like using Novelties to go along with our read-alouds.

    mitchejo@clay.k12.in.us

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  100. I'll be teaching Reading for the first time in an "upper" grade this year, I plan on using some components of the Daily 5 in combination with content area strategies to build fluency and comprehension! I'd love to use these mats in my room!

    Email: ssheehan@k12tn.net

    ReplyDelete
  101. Cheri Barnes

    I teach 4th grade reading, writing, and grammar to 3 classes. One thing that the students do is work in groups on skills such as cause, effect, comparing, contrasting, vocabulary, fact, opinion, etc. Then I display their work using the document camera, and we discuss them. My email address is Toddcheri1@aol.com. Thanks so much!!!!!!!! :)

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  102. If it's not too late, I would love the samples of these. I have the set on my wishlist in TPT:)) I would love to use these mats in my guided reading small groups. I do Daily 5 in my classroom but because of the mix of kids I get and their scores coming in...I can't give up my small reading groups to do Daily 5 exactly like they say:) But, it works for me:))
    tara.eiken1@gmail.com

    4th Grade Frolics

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  103. I just now figured out how to not be anonymous! I am Cheri Barnes from above. Toddcheri1@aol.com Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oops! Well, that didn't work. How do I get it to recognize me? I am trying to sign in as my AOL name. Hmmm . . .

      Delete
    2. Maybe this is it. Sorry about all the messages. Looks like it worked. I had to make a Google account.

      Delete
  104. What a terrific freebie! Thank you for sharing this at TBA and linking up!
    ~Fern
    Fern Smith’s Classroom Ideas!
    Fern Smith’s Pinterest Boards!

    ReplyDelete
  105. Thanks for sharing this fabulous idea! One thing I do, although it may not be "new" is use what I call a 2x2. Kids write as many two word phrases that they can think of relating to what they've read or learned in two minutes. They then choose one or two to text in using ActivExpressions or share with table mates.

    Farrah
    fkilgo@gmail.com
    ThinkShareTeach

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  106. Wow, thanks for sharing...I am moving from 1st to 4th grade! Will be an adventure! I love having my kids respond to literature. We started making anchor charts for specific ways to respond and then my kids would respond on post-its and stick to the chart. They loved reading each other's responses. Not sure how well that will work in 4th...
    Amy
    mommyinca (at) yahoo.com

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  107. Alright, I have sent to everyone up until this point! Thank you again for your awesome ideas. We are all learning so much because of you guys!

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  108. I hope I'm not too late! Thank you for such a wonderful post. It really got everyone sharing & trading ideas and that's what teaching is all about! This last year foldables and reader journals played a big part in our learning. However, I feel that most of it was teacher led instead of student driven. I would appreciate a preview of the mats to share with my team. I already have the reading log on my wish list at TPT. I learned so much from your post :) jsguetzow@gmail.com

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  109. I have been teaching math for 8 years to fifth graders and this year I will be teaching reading. This is awesome and would love to have the sample. I also have enjoyed reading all of the ideas that would help me in my classroom this year. I hope I am not too late. If so, I can go to your store. Thank you so much. My email is amie.moore@duncanps.org. Thanks again!

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  110. I'm always looking for something new to help get my kids interested in reading. My biggest challenge is getting them to think as they read. I would love to try out your idea!
    Jane
    jthoms100@gmail.com

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  111. Thank you again for your ideas everyone! I have it sent to everyone up until this point.

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  112. Thank you Stephanie!
    I started using reading response journals this year. We read in class, each student uses post it notes, for HW picks a post it and writes about it. It was really interesting. I am looking forward to trying your idea.
    Peggy
    mrspaulson@gmail.com

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  113. I started using a class blog for text reflections in our Reading block. The students loved it!!! It was not only a way for them to respond to the text, but I found it also brought them enrichment. They could see their peers' responses and were able to comment on each other . It was such an awesome addition to the class that we used the blog for everything. I would love to adapt your Comprehension Mats in the new school year. Thanks for sharing.

    Malinda Gorham
    mgorham78@gmail.com

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  114. we are beginning CA Treasures this year! ANY help appreciated! LOVE the mats!
    mccarty20001@yahoo.com

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  115. I used a "bookmark" for my students. My bookmark had several different comprehension strategies on it...almost like a very mini version of your comprehension mats. It worked pretty well... but I am way excited to try your mats!! :) thank you so much!
    ashleystout82@gmail.com

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  116. I'd love to have your mats! We sing a little song "We check, we check, we check for understanding." Too bad you can't here the tune - I'm singing it now. :) We practice questions we can ask our buddy reader, etc. to check for understanding.

    Thanks for sharing.
    Shelly
    projectqn@tx.rr.com

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  117. I LOVE these mats! Just a quick question - How do you check/grade these or are the responses used in whole group?

    Thanks for all of your GREAT ideas!

    mfvickery@gmail.com

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  118. These mats sound like a great idea! To help in Comprehension in my classroom this past year, I had children blog about what they were reading using Kidblog so each child could have their own login and user profile. I had the children do a couple of different kinds of posts in response to their reading. One was a Thinking Stem when they had to share connections with me about the text they were reading. Another was a story summary where they had to share the theme, events, main characters, and a brief summary about what they were reading that week. The kids enjoyed using the computer, but they were only able to blog about it after they had read.

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  119. Thank you again everyone! We are learning each day when you share. I have everyone who left an email address up until this point.

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  120. I love using graphic organizers in my classroom that go along with the comprehension skill we are working on. Most of my organizers go along with Reading with Meaning by Debbie Miller.

    ladunker@gmail.com

    THANKS! :)

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  121. My students would love this board! They beg me to use my marker boards for just about anything. I made popsicle sticks with different standard comprehension questions and picked students to be the discussion leader among a small group. The discussion leader had to keep the conversation going for a certain amount of time, and every person in the group had to talk. At the end, the kids went back to their seat and wrote about the story.

    ahahn27@aol.com

    Thanks again!

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  122. Great mats! I do a lot of group work and kids have to respond to what they read. This would be a great way to assess their learning and application of the focus strategy. mgcalado6@gmail.com

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    1. wrong email- sorry mgcalado4@gmail.com

      Delete
  123. love your ideas. Thanks for sharing.
    pttaz@bellsouth.net
    Lorri

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  124. Great ideas! I love your blog. This next year I want to focus more on making connections(text to text, text to self, text to world). I will give the students sticky notes and when the students can make a connection during their independent reading time they will write in on a sticky note and put it in their book. After they finish their book they will take their sticky note out and put it on a recording sheet.

    thanks!! here is my email: taliawible@aol.com

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  125. These look great. I'm always looking for new ideas to use with my reading group.

    daeeagles@gmail.com

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  126. What a cool way to make our new curriculum a little easier to swallow!

    flemingk@bsd405.org

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  127. Stephanie,
    I left a comment earlier and mistyped my email! I absolutely love your blog! I am thinking about implementing the Reading Workshop approach this year and frankly, I am scared! In the past, I have used a basal and literature units each year. I feel "behind in the times" as I read your post and others! Thanks for all your ideas!
    taylors39@k12tn.net

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  128. Love it, love it, love it! charofsid20@yahoo.com

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  129. This is awesome! I was using "the ART of Comprehension" and the kids became lazy. This would be a great tool in my classroom this year! heatherschuster@verizon.net

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  130. Can't wait to use these mats in my Readers Workshop. I am switching to 5th (looping actually) and desperately need new ideas to enhance skills from 4th grade. Your comprehension mats are great. Thank you! sclareds@gmail.com

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  131. I'd love to have a comprehension mat! I'd like to have one at my literacy area for comprehension needs. Thank you! l.harford@smgonline.org

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  132. I too would love to have a comprehension mat sample. I love your idea about putting the "book commercials" on a ring (including the name card!). We do something similar and the kids love it! My email is abean@rockfordschools.org
    Thank you so much for sharing your awesome ideas! I really appreciate you!

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  133. So glad I found your blog...I teach grade 3/4/5/6 and this would be great for group work with students in various levels. I create my own comprehension questions but I love the mat idea. wagalus@cablerocket.com

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  134. I use something similar, but I am always looking so the students won't get bored. We will have been in school for a month on Thursday. WOW! Time is flying. Thanks for sharing!

    -Mo

    maestraw@msn.com

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  135. I am a parent with a child that has problems understand what he reads..I really dont have anything that I do at home beside just ask questions about the story but I think this would be fun...Please email me at ashleyhomeschool@yahoo.com

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  136. Hello Stephaine,
    I love the idea of the reader response mats. In reading this year with my fourth graders we are focusing on non-fiction studies as my focus is science and social studies content. My students are writing in non-fiction reader response journals and and creating thinking maps to show their learning. I also hope to do literature circles with them as the year progresses.
    Thanks in advance for sending me two of your mats. I will probably look into buying them too!
    Kristen
    porterk2@gcsnc.com

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    Replies
    1. Hi Stephanie,
      I hate to bother you but I did not recieve the two free mats that you sent me via email.I wonder if maybe my school email didn't accept them. Can you send them to my personal account at porterk@northstate.net

      Thanks in advance and I look forward to using them!
      Kristen

      Delete
  137. I have everyone up to here. Thank you for sharing your great ideas!!

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  138. This looks great. I usually use a reader notebook and sticky notes. This will be a great addition, and I like I wont have to do so many copies.
    Dbaer@gpsbulldogs.org

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    Replies
    1. I sent it now. I hope it gets to you! Please let me know.

      Delete
  139. This year I am adding in a responding to text component where students will spend 10-15 minutes during the last part of our reading block (before lunch), writing about something they read during the day.

    Amanda@woodrufffamily.org

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  140. I had the students make a story quilt with their book club groups. They also keep track of their reading using illustrations, vocab words, and responses in a packet for each book they read.

    lwooten at pps dot net

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  141. I have been searching for a new way to check for understanding and making my students accountable. I think your comprehension mats just may be the answer I have been looking for. I have started using Daily 5 in my room this year and am totally changing up my language and math programs to make them more talk based and collaboratively focused. I would love one of your mats to start off my new comprehension journey! Thanks! sheiarno@fc.amdsb.ca

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  142. Love it! I definitely want a copy! Please send it to tparosa@gmail.com
    Thanks!!

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  143. Love this idea! I'm currently setting up my book clubs for the year (lit circles). This would be a great addition.
    crestmoorfifth@gmail.com

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  144. This looks great! Teaching 5th grade for the 1st time and trying to find my way. Please send to mandyowenguthrie@hotmail.com

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  145. I am teaching in Australia and have just moved to 3/4 after many years in 5/6 and am always on the lookout for new ways to engage and create enthusiasm. Love your blog and am now a regular reader!
    My email is :
    abers47_99@yahoo.com
    Thanks
    Julie

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  146. I love this idea.. so creative and love that you can reuse it! I am about to begin my student teaching (finishing up my masters) and would love to implement this!
    laura.r.bell@gmail.com

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  147. I'm sorry, but is this offer over? I would love to have this resource! Thanks
    Laura.r.bell@gmail.com

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  148. I am currently working grades 3/4 special education (which really means k-4!) I have tried Daily 5 along with our Scott Foresman series. It has been a challenge with all the differentiation I need in the classroom. I have been blog hopping and pinterest hopping in hopes to find things that will work with my students. Your mats sound like a great idea! Thank you for sharing!
    Janine j105w@yahoo.com

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  149. Love your mat idea! My reading logs include a section that follows a skill/strategy that has been taught in Guided Reading. For example we spent time on discussing Questioning; Explicit and Implicit. So this past week's Rdg Log students had to record at least 1 question per session and indicate whether it was explicit or implicit. It gives the student a chance to share with parent what they've learned and it allows me to see how they continue to practice.
    Thanks in advance for the freebie.
    Jamaka18@sbcglobal.net

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  150. Thanks, Stephanie! Love your blog...great ideas.
    cindyhornyak@gmail.com

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  151. I am using thinkmarks this year for students to keep track of their thinking. I would love to try out your mats!! tcdonn@aol.com

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  152. I would love to try these. Thanks.
    kmeissner3@yahoo.com

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  153. I am doing Reading Workshop this year in my classes. The kids love it! I am always looking for reading comprehension ideas! Would love to see your mats. rfrisby@mvn.net

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  154. I just saw your Facebook post. Don't know how i missed these up until now. I have been using Laura Candler's Talking Sticks for mini literature circles and using your Reader's Response Logs to help with meaningful thinking about reading. We are also blogging this year, which really engages them in the reflection piece. I would love a sample of these. Thanks for sharing.
    H White
    hawhite@henrico.k12.va.us

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  155. I am doing Reading Workshop in my classes this year. I like the comprehension mat idea and can't wait to see what they are going to look like. I am always looking for ways to improve comprehension skills. Please can you send me a copy to: austin_charlene@rocketmail.com. I would really appreciate it.

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  156. Foldables and interactive reading journals are two tools that I use with my students to improve their reading skills. I am looking forward to trying your comprehension mats as well! reginabeckham66@gmail.com

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  157. I'd love a copy of your comprehension mats! Great idea. I started a visualization book with kids that have a hard time "making a movie in their heads" while reading. Students stop after each chapter and draw something that they pictured. This is great for those that are artistic, but can't get into a book.
    Thanks!
    Leah Meyer
    SmithL03@wsdmi.org (that's a zero after that L)

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  158. OK...I have everyone covered up to here!
    Stephanie

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  159. I would love to have a sample of your comprehension mats. I have been having my students journal quite a bit using common core reading stems. My email is funcaligirl38 with gmail.

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  160. I would love to have a sample of your comprehension mats. All though I am not a teacher, I try to help my daughter as much as I can with comprehension. Thank you for the idea.

    den2mom@comcast.net

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  161. I would love to have a sample of your comprehension mats. All though I am not a teacher, I try to help my daughter as much as I can with comprehension. Thank you for the idea.

    den2mom@comcast.net

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  162. Oh I sure hope you are still emailing these out! I'm not a teacher, I'm a part time stay at home mom and I am very much invested in my son's education. He does well with reading, however he needs more practice with comprehension and I really need help on HOW I can help him :) My email address is:

    kyans.mama@gmail.com

    Thank you!!

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  163. In my reading small groups, after we read, I ask them some questions about the story including higher order thinking questions. If they get the question correct, they get to take 2 shots at a small basketball net that I have beside our table. It really helps those that normally aren't paying as much attention while they are reading or while others are reading. But being able to shoot a ball if they answer a question correctly helps give them an incentive. They love it!!
    blb9752@gmail.com THANKS!!

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  164. Are you still sending these out?! Love this idea! I started having my kids use sticky notes recently-not a new idea but one I haven;t tried before and the kids are just loving it. I really see them thinking about their reading and what they will "jot" down. My email is breatheinletgo@gmail.com. Thank you!!

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  165. I am a 5th grade Special Education teacher .... and my students struggle a lot with reading and comprehension in a big way. I have tried to see what else I can come up with to help them grow in that area. I have them read passages and stories and we go through it together, then of course they have independent time to do it on their own. They have grown some but need more help in this area - I love your idea of the mats .... they love being able to use the markers for anything and I think will be more engaged. I love your ideas !! email: ntxmom3@Gmail.com thanks a million ... Lisa

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  166. I would love to try this out! I use the guided reading approach to my literature block. I think this will be very engaging to my students! Thank you! tallmonje@glenwoodschools.org

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  167. I would love to try this out! I use the guided reading approach to my literature block. I think this will be very engaging to my students! Thank you! tallmonje@glenwoodschools.org

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  168. I would love these.... what a great idea... if you have fiction and nonfiction I would really love them.... laurabass.teach@gmail.com

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  169. I use comprehension cards and I would love to try these out! jclothier@queensburyschool.org

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  170. I am switching from teaching Kindergarten for 10 years to teaching 2nd next year... can we say "Yikes!" ?! I started using "retelling sticks" this year with my kinders that they could use during read-to-self and read-to-someone. Their retelling skills improved drastically, as well as their overall comprehension. They were simply picture cards with question words on them, glued to construction paper and laminated. The purpose was to remind them of the questions they should be asking while reading and answering during a retelling.

    I would love to try your comprehension mats this year in 2nd!

    Thanks!
    Carly Schrader
    cschrade@pasco.k12.fl.us

    ReplyDelete
  171. I've had students create a vocabulary notebook with 10 new words a week. They guess the definition and then check it in a dictionary. They also have to draw a picture or write a sentence with each new word. Many of the students would get really excited when they would be reading something and come across a word they had used in their notebooks. I also did vocabulary on powerpoint for our reading stories. Thanks for sharing! vickiluckey@yahoo.com

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  172. I would love to try your comp. mats. I teach 2nd and will be having literature circles and think these will be great.
    samanthahoda@att.net

    THANKS!!

    ReplyDelete
  173. Hi,
    I work with bilingual students who are in testing grades. This is a wonderful way to use the strategies that work! I created posters, bookmarks and mini posters for the strategies. The book marks had sentence stems to help the student acquire the academic language to begin discussions.I did mini lessons on how to use the strategies in fiction and non fiction. Which helped tremendously :)I would really like to get a copy of your mats.yperez10772@gmail.com
    Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  174. I am new to 4th grade this year and would LOVE to try your comprehension mats! I just found your site today, and have spent way too many hours on it. You are a wealth of information with amazing ideas. I just wanted you to know how much I appreciate all that you share. I have taught 2nd grade for 10 years and have been pretty nervous about the change, but after going through your site...you have given me so much to get me going!

    As far as the share, in 2nd grade the last few months I did book clubs where the kids could write down their top three choices. That gave me enough flexibility to group them according to levels. EVERYONE in the classroom was reading in their groups (I was with the low ones) and at about 15-20 min. I would ring the bell..they would put down their books and get out their logs, talk about what they were going to write and then get busy doing some kind of B,M,E of what they just read, prediction, etc. It varied. I did a lot of training at the beginning and it paid off. Several of my book clubs made it through 4-5 chapter books the last few months of school. My parents loved it, because at that age they usually only want to read a book from the same usual series and this opened them up to all different kinds of books.

    My email is lmcbride@lvlions.org
    THANK YOU for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  175. Well, this is my first year teaching, I haven't tried anything but would LOVE to try this strategy.During my internship, I used tons of graphic organizers, I found that if students made them pop up with construction paper such as flip ones or pocket ones, they enjoy it more. I also tie themes from the story. Such as a story about space, the students incorporated a graphic organizer on a cut out space ship.
    My email bushra_bibi2006@yahoo.com

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  176. Hello
    This is my seventh year of teaching second grade but this year has been different. I had a baby at the beginning of the year and I am returning to work for the first time on Monday. My school district has a new reading series and I look forward to trying the comprehension mats. Thanks for this wonderful idea. kaylahenr@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  177. I really love this idea. We usually do book talks and lit circles. This is my first year and I think this would be great to start and continue in my years to come. Thanks for sharing

    leveridge@nzisd.org

    ReplyDelete
  178. I think your idea is awesome. I am an ESL teacher and I need to have my students answer orally before they write their answers. If I just hand them questions and ask them to write their answers, most of the time the answers will be off topic. I would love to have a sample of your work. It looks like a great way to motivate students to do their work and learn!
    Terrebeth1@aol.com

    ReplyDelete
  179. Would love a copy to use with my resource room students!!
    Thank you!
    LDreher68@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  180. Would love a copy to use with my resource room students!!
    Thank you!
    LDreher68@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  181. I would love these!! My class has been using the deeper questions on the picture cards from the Journeys packs. They are very MCLASS friendly!!
    My email is ajudge@ncmcs.org

    THANK YOU!!!!!

    ReplyDelete

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